Answered By: Eliza Selander
Last Updated: Jun 01, 2016     Views: 227

A primary source is direct evidence or firsthand testimony of an event or time period.

Primary sources don't have to be handwritten. See the chart below for types of primary sources and ideas about where to find them.

Type:   Try: What to do next:

Letters

U.S. History in Context or

World History in Context

Above the main search box, select "Primary Sources."

Bonus: In Advanced Search, select Document Type: "Correspondence" and/or "Letter."

Manuscripts NYPL Digital Gallery Browse images in "Arts and Literature" or "History and Geography" to find manuscripts.

Journals/

Diaries

U.S. History in Context or

World History in Context

Above the main search box, select "Primary Sources."

Bonus: In Advanced Search, select Document Type: "Diary Entry."

Newspapers/

Magazines

ProQuest Research Library In Advanced Search, select Source Type: "Newspapers."
Speeches Academic Search Complete In Advanced Search, select Document Type: "Speech."
Interviews Internet search or word-of-mouth Speak with your professor to find ideas of experts in the field of your research who might be willing to speak with you.
Memoirs Library catalog Search "Memoir."
Photographs AP Images Browse photos on the main page, or use the search box.

Audio

Opposing Viewpoints Select Document Type: "Podcast."
Video Library catalog On the main page of the catalog, click the link for "streaming video."
Data Academic Search Complete

In Advanced Search: under Image Quick View Types," select "Graph, Chart, or Diagram."

Objects/

Artifacts

Visit local museums or check museum web sites

The Smithsonian, National Archives, Holocaust Museum